Ni Una Más

Conversation about seeking justice for femicide in Mexico through poetry, journalism and law with poet Claudia Castro Luna, lawyer Norma Ledezma Ortega and Seattle Times journalists Corinne Chin and Erika Schultz. See The Seattle Times project here.

Ni Una Mas

One River, Many Voices

Available now from Chin Music Press. The sales through the press will benefit Columbia Riverkeeper.

One River, Many Voices celebrates the Columbia River’s energy, beauty and power. It honors the resilience of Native peoples who for millenia have lived along its banks and at this historical juncture with climate change, it is a call to consider our personal role as stewards of the natural world.

Claudia holding the accordion style fold out book.

Washington Poetic Routes

Map of WashingtonWashington Poetic Routes is a digital poetry-mapping project that explores Washington’s rich geographical terrain, both in terms of landscape and in terms of the human relationships that unfold across the State.

Geography is inescapable. We are bound to the places we inhabit, the terrain we call home. My hope is that through writing and reading poems that tell of the places we call home written by Washingtonians of all ages and locations, we can learn a little bit more about our cities, towns, mountains, rivers, know a little more about our birds and fish, learn about the stories that define a particular place, read from a fifth grader what it is like to live in a place where eventide means ladders left leaning on apple tree orchards awaiting tomorrow’s harvest.

Selected Press

A Living Map of Washington State Poetry, by David Haldeman, April 11, 2019

Seattle Symphony Project

In February 2017, Claudia Castro Luna collaborated with Seattle Symphony and Mary’s Place on a project in response to Seattle’s State of Emergency Declaration on Homelessness.

Selected Press

Seattle Symphony brings homelessness inside the concert hall, Jason Victor Serinus. The Seattle Times. Jan 29, 2017.

Listening to Every Voice: Ives, Art, Poetry, and the Homeless (podcast). Classical KING FM. Feb 1, 2017.

Can the Arts Address Seattle’s Homelessness Crisis in a Meaningful Way? Seattle Symphony Is Trying, Rich Smith. The Stranger. Feb 1, 2017.

 

CRUEDA

In 2016/2017, Claudia Castro Luna curated Word’s Worth, a series of readings for the City of Seattle Civil Rights, Utilities, Economic Development and Arts Committee (CRUEDA). Four selections are available here and more can be found on the Seattle Channel under CRUEDA.

Seattle Poetic Grid

 Seattle Civic Poet, Claudia Castro Luna, launches a poetry map of the city. Seattle Poetic Grid (www.seattlepoeticgrid.com) is an interactive poetic cartography of the city and a culmination of Castro Luna’s two-year Civic Poet residency. The Grid brings Seattle’s poetic side to light. The project is intended to remain as a living testament of the city, and includes a link for those who would like to make their poetic contributions.

Many of the poems were collected during Castro Luna’s “The Poet Is In” program, a residency project with Seattle Public Library where she held drop-in poetry writing sessions at various libraries around the city. Aside from English there are poems in Spanish, Arabic and Japanese. There is a wide spectrum of voices and experiences represented, from youth poets and elementary school writers, to senior citizens and renowned poets like Denise Levertov, Theodore Roethke and Richard Hugo.

“The idea behind the map is to capture a sense of place through the poetic voices of Seattle residents. The poems come from citizens across every corner of the city, from individuals brand new to writing to some who are well established and beloved poets,” says Castro Luna.

(from Seattle.Gov Art Beat, written by Erika Lindsey)

 

Selected Press

Seattle’s Civic Poet Has Made a Poetic Map of the City, Amber Cortes. The Stranger SLOG. Jun 28, 2017.

Urban Planner Turned Poet Maps Seattle’s Story, Josh Cohen. Next City. July 5, 2017.

Seattle Poetic Grid

a map of seattle showing dots for locations where poets have written a poemSeattle Civic Poet, Claudia Castro Luna, launches a poetry map of the city. Seattle Poetic Grid (http://www.seattlepoeticgrid.com) is an interactive poetic cartography of the city and a culmination of Castro Luna’s two-year Civic Poet residency. The Grid brings Seattle’s poetic side to light. The project is intended to remain as a living testament of the city, and includes a link for those who would like to make their poetic contributions.

Many of the poems were collected during Castro Luna’s “The Poet Is In” program, a residency project with Seattle Public Library where she held drop-in poetry writing sessions at various libraries around the city. Aside from English there are poems in Spanish, Arabic and Japanese. There is a wide spectrum of voices and experiences represented, from youth poets and elementary school writers, to senior citizens and renowned poets like Denise Levertov, Theodore Roethke and Richard Hugo.

“The idea behind the map is to capture a sense of place through the poetic voices of Seattle residents. The poems come from citizens across every corner of the city, from individuals brand new to writing to some who are well established and beloved poets,” says Castro Luna.

(from Seattle.Gov Art Beat, written by Erika Lindsey)

Selected Press

Seattle’s Civic Poet Has Made a Poetic Map of the City, Amber Cortes. The Stranger SLOG. Jun 28, 2017.

Urban Planner Turned Poet Maps Seattle’s Story, Josh Cohen. Next City. July 5, 2017.

Seattle Symphony Project

In February 2017, Claudia Castro Luna collaborated with Seattle Symphony and Mary’s Place on a project in response to Seattle’s State of Emergency Declaration on Homelessness.

Selected Press

Seattle Symphony brings homelessness inside the concert hall, Jason Victor Serinus. The Seattle Times. Jan 29, 2017.

Listening to Every Voice: Ives, Art, Poetry, and the Homeless (podcast). Classical KING FM. Feb 1, 2017.

Can the Arts Address Seattle’s Homelessness Crisis in a Meaningful Way? Seattle Symphony Is Trying, Rich Smith. The Stranger. Feb 1, 2017.